Exercises To Assume Certain Moods; Change To Any Selected State Of Mind; How To Stalk The Predator

(The Universal Spiderweb by Armando Torres)

“For a sorcerer who travels to the unknown, the fixedness of the attention is like an anchor that he uses to stabilize the perception in any new position that he’s able to reach. What they do is examine in detail each article in their sight; when the element begins to distort, they pass to another. So, without caring where they go, they use that technique to stay focused.”

“When they want to return to the daily world, they use the inverse technique; however, there are stories of sorcerers who went to explore and never returned.”

“Our defenses are more fragile than they seem; any drink or any drug can induce us to perceive the unknown. It’s very easy to move the assemblage point; the difficult thing is to maintain it stable in the new position. It’s so easy that, if we want, it’s possible to move it simply by an act of will. People do it all the time, but in an unconscious way. Only sorcerers do it deliberately; in fact, it’s that capacity that makes one a sorcerer.”

“Sorcery is a state of mind, a level of realization in which the practitioner is fully cognizant of himself and his environment. That allows him to apply his will to certain aspects of the world, getting results that seem supernatural for those who don’t know what’s going on.”

“Theatrical plays,” he said, “are an excellent training to achieve that end. You can begin with simple exercises, to, for example, assume certain moods or states. It isn’t difficult to do that; after some minutes of intent, one can effectively change to any selected state of mind.”

“You make it sound so easy,” I told him, “but my experience shows me that it’s exactly the opposite; that in fact, it takes a lot of work to move it.”

“Nevertheless, if you intend it, it’ll move for sure,” he said with conviction. “Maybe just a little at the beginning, but, with practice, it’s possible to carry out more elaborate movements; in that way, you can get connected with the infinite and end up visiting places that would bewilder anyone. Properly speaking, this way of manipulating the fixed position of the assemblage point is called ‘stalking.’”

“When stalking, we explore the world like predators, but, after a time, and, mainly when one ends up forgetting that the fixation of the attention has been a product of a choice, the technique loses its effectiveness, and one lapses back into the everyday world. This is what happens when, for example, a puma discovers the route of the antelopes. At the beginning, his stalking will get results, but soon after, the ruminant will abandon that route because they too will have learned how to stalk the predator.

If the puma is too stupid to change its habits on time, it’ll end up dying from hunger. Maybe a better example would be the parasites. As you know, there are organisms that are able to convert other living beings into their food; they don’t need new prey because they get enough just by taking some of the vitality of their victims without killing them.”

“But those colonies of parasites that have reached an optimal position of reproductive efficiency, instead of increasing their possibilities, in fact, they drain them because they’ve killed their prey, and, contrary to the puma, those colonies can no longer move to find another victim, and they end up perishing. It’s for that reason that natural selection favors the evolution of those organisms that can strike a balance between fluency and fixedness.”

“The ecological problems that modern man faces today are the result of the fixity in the position of the predator. We’ve reached such a grade of efficiency as predators that we’ve placed our own existence as species at risk because, just like the parasites, we don’t have another place to go; our success as predators has become our greatest threat.”

***

Click for Translation »